NDACC News and Events

May
2010

NDACC established the designation of "Cooperating Network" to formalize the relationship with regional, hemispheric, or global networks of instruments that operate independently of NDACC, but where strong measurement and scientific collaboration is mutually beneficial. More information on the "Cooperating Network" Protocol is found in the "Protocols" area of the NDACC web pages.

In the Fall of 2009, five Networks signed memoranda of understanding to complete the Cooperating Network designation. These networks are:

May
2010

High spectral-resolution infrared solar transmission spectra contain information about the vertical distribution of the absorbing species in the terrestrial atmosphere due to the pressure broadening of the absorption lines. This feature is being exploited in the Infrared Working Group to retrieve vertical profile information of several atmospheric trace gases, such as O3, CO, N2O, CH4, HCl, HF, HNO3, C2H6 and HCN, in addition to the total column abundances.

May
2010

A highly variable interference has long been considered the dominant feature of water vapor for practitioners who retrieve atmospheric total column amounts and profiles from infrared solar absorption spectra. Due to the importance of water as a greenhouse gas and its possible long-term trend resulting from changes in the atmosphere and subsequent feedback effects there is renewed effort in extracting water vapor quantities from archived solar spectra, which for some sites stretch back to the 1970's.

January
2009

At the 2008 NDACC Steering Committee meeting, an ad hoc working group was established to review existing and assess future Network measurement strategies and emphases in light of the broadening of Network goals over those established at its inception.

January
2009

In the early days of NDACC (then NDSC), the Infrared Working Group (IRWG) targeted the retrieval of total columns of several gases considered of primary importance to the original goals of the Network. These goals focused on increasing our understanding of ozone chemistry and, in the post-Montreal Protocol period, observing the accumulation (and hopefully the eventual decline) of Cly  and Fy in the stratosphere. Consequently, the initial gases targeted were ozone, nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous oxide (N2O ), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen fluoride (HF).

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